Assistant Professor, University of Iowa

Month: June 2010

Looking for a Research Assistant in Kibera?

Looking for a Research Assistant in Kibera?

“Maybe, you can promote me?” You’ll hear these words a lot if you spend any time in Kenya. Taxi drivers, hawkers, safari guides, etc. For the most part they just want your business at that moment, not necessarily for you to “promote” them to the […]

Togetherness Supreme Released (Screening 5 June in Kibera)

Togetherness Supreme Released (Screening 5 June in Kibera)

While I’ve been in Kenya, I’ve spent a lot of my time working with Hot Sun Foundation in Kibera. Their sister group/film production unit Hot Sun Films has just released Togetherness Supreme, a feature-length film about three youth from different ethnic groups that get caught […]

New Article in Mass Communication and Society

New Article in Mass Communication and Society

The article “Credibility in Context: How Uncivil Online Commentary Affects News Credibility” written by Kjerstin Thorson, Emily Vraga, and myself has just been published by Mass Communication and Society. Here’s the abstract:

In the new media environment, hard news stories are no longer found solely in the “A” section of the paper or on the front page of a news Web site. They are now distributed widely, appearing in contexts as disparate as a partisan blog or your own e-mail inbox, forwarded by a friend. In this study, we investigate how the credibility of a news story is affected by the context in which it appears. Results of an experiment show a news story embedded in an uncivil partisan blog post appears more credible in contrast. Specifically, a blogger’s incivility highlights the relative credibility of the newspaper article. We also find that incivility and partisan disagreement in an adjacent blog post produce stronger correlations between ratings of news and blog credibility. These findings suggest that news story credibility is affected by context and that these context effects can have surprising benefits for news organizations. Findings are consistent with predictions of social judgment theory.

As a special bonus (to me, I guess), the same issue has an article about Lost!